New Food Find: An Egg Yolk Substitute for Egg Allergy

New Food Find: An Egg Yolk Substitute for Egg Allergy
There are many egg substitutes on the market today which allow those with egg allergy to replace mayonnaise, bake cakes and even make mock egg whites.  But until now, there has not been an easy replacement for the egg yolk.


A new product called, "The Vegg," is a vegan egg yolk alternative and 

allows those with egg allergy to finally have a replacement for fried or scrambled "eggs", Hollandaise sauce, frittatas, omelets, and more.


Vegg is made from nutritional yeast, sodium alginate (a seaweed derivative), black salt and beta carotene. 

For more information:

The Vegg website

 

Nutrition information

 

 

Here's a how-to video that shows how to use The Vegg to make a spherical "vegg" yolk:

 

The information shared here is for your convenience only, it is not an endorsement or guarantee of the product's safety. Please read the ingredient labels and contact the manufacturers if needed to confirm the safety of a product for your child.

 

Posted by: Melanie Carver, KFA's Web Developer & News Editor, a long-time vegan and mother of two children with food allergies.

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Comments (6)

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Originally Posted by The Vegg Man:

Hand mixing..., anthing but blending, is a def no-no. Blending creates a smooth luxurious thick yolk. 

 

I blended the Vegg with my stick blender to get the yolk consistency, but then tried to hand mix the prepared Vegg into my milk mixture and it wouldn't blend in. I didn't realize the liquid Vegg mixture would need to be blended into other liquids once it was prepared. 

 

On the french toast try just dipping  day old sour dough bread into Vegg mixture with no milk for maximal eggy taste. I'm suprised you did't think it tasted like french toast since it's almost unanimously judged to be  'just like' french toast.

 

Thanks for your thoughts and tips. Since the recipe linked on the website listed soymilk for the french toast batter, I added milk to mine as well. I admit I'm a harsh critic for egg free french toast. It's the only food I truly miss being egg free for my son's egg allergy. I have yet to find one that I'm willing to make and eat at home. It really is a textural issue for me. I can mostly replicate the flavor with Nog alternatives, but can't get the texture. I'm going to try a baked french toast casserole in hopes that it will eliminate the soggy middle issue while adding a nice crusty top - I hope

Hand mixing..., anthing but blending, is a def no-no. Blending creates a smooth luxurious thick yolk.  On the french toast try just dipping  day old sour dough bread into Vegg mixture with no milk for maximal eggy taste. I'm suprised you did't think it tasted like french toast since it's almost unanimously judged to be  'just like' french toast.

French Toast and Pancakes: Verdict - Meh x 3

 

Mixing it - I didn't want to mix up the entire pouch. After some looking along the website I found you could mix it up in smaller batches if you have a device that can blend a smaller amount of liquid. I did 4 tsp and 1 cup water and blended with a stick blender. The smell is quite strong! 

 

Pancake: I thought I could then hand blend the prepared product into my pancake batter. It did not blend in completely. I saw yellow bits and bobs throughout. The finished pancakes also had a weird flavor to them, almost bitter. I don't think my kids noticed and ate theirs fine. 

 

French toast - I again tried hand mixing the prepared Vegg into my milk, but it didn't blend. I had to get the stick blender out again to get it emulsified into the milk. Splashed in a bit of vanilla, then quickly coated my wheat bread into the mix and onto the griddle. The recipes posted on The Vegg site essentially called for pan frying the coated bread. So even though I was using a non-stick electric griddle, I applied a generous amount of margarine (Fleishman's unsalted). Placing the coated bread caused a lot of popping - got burned for the first time in a long time. I sprinkled cinnamon directly on the bread. Also despite the non-stick griddle and the margarine, the bread stuck. I had to let it cook so long to release that it was dark brown to the point that the kids asked why I burnt it. It forms a very thin crust under which the bread is still soggy. I'm not sure how to remedy that and one of the frustrations I've had with other non-egg french toast recipes. My other disappointment is that it didn't even taste like french toast. I've gotten much better flavor results using Nog products. DD and I ate a few bites. DS ate his piece and thought it was OK, but no requests for more. 

 

I'm planning on trying it again in a lemon pie recipe I have. Perhaps it will work better in a custard/curd type application. 

 

 

Views and reviews expressed by volunteers reflect their personal opinions and not necessarily the views or opinions of Kids With Food Allergies Foundation.

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