Tagged With "Research"

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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Elisa2 ·
Hi: I could not access the registry. It never responded. I was in a perpetual state of “one moment please”….
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

K8sMom2002 ·
Thanks! Can you tell me a little bit about what browser you're using? I'll make sure to send an alert to the folks who work with the registry.
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Elisa2 ·
Safari 10.0.3 on a Mac using El Capitan
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

K8sMom2002 ·
Thanks! I'll forward this info, too. I know I was able to access the registry some months ago using Safari on Lion ... we'll get it sorted out for you. Thanks for wanting to participate! I have a feeling that this registry is going to help drive food allergy research far!
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Kathy P ·
Hi @Elisa2 - Can you tell me how far you got in the process? Were you able to create your account? Able to log in? On what page did it get stuck for you? I just went through the process to create a new account and then log in. There are pages that load quite slowly.
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Elisa2 ·
The enter registry button…. I left it running for some time…it never got past “one moment please"
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Kathy P ·
Thanks - can you try it again when you a chance?
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Elisa2 ·
still no joy
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Elisa2 ·
still not working. I let it run for 30 min.
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Re: Help Drive the Future of Food Allergy Research

Kathy P ·
Thanks Elisa - I sent you private message. We'll get this sorted out for you. Thanks for your patience and persistence!
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Re: Can We EAT Our Way to Prevention of Food Allergies?

NKS ·
Hi, is there a typo in this summary? I may just be tired, but I don't see how this reflects a risk reduction (at all, let alone 67%): Thanks, Naomi However, when the authors evaluated the infants that were able to maintain the study protocol by eating these foods consistently each week, they did find a significant difference in rates of food allergy: - 4% in the early introduction group versus - 3% in the standard group On Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 3:39 PM, Kids With Food Allergies <...
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Re: Can We EAT Our Way to Prevention of Food Allergies?

KFA News Team ·
Update: We fixed a coding error to correct this section above: However, when the authors evaluated the infants that were able to maintain the study protocol by eating these foods consistently each week, they did find a significant difference in rates of food allergy: 2.4% in the early introduction group versus 7.3% in the standard group
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Re: Four Moms Show Power of Getting Involved in Food Allergy Research

K8sMom2002 ·
Oh, wow! I am so excited about this! Can't wait to hear more ... and maybe in five years, we'll be so much further down the road than we are now. Thank you, ladies, for the hard work you've put into this!
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Re: Four Moms Show Power of Getting Involved in Food Allergy Research

AndreaN ·
This is fantastic! Thank you for all your work!
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Re: Four Moms Show Power of Getting Involved in Food Allergy Research

Gloria ·
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead
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Re: Four Moms Show Power of Getting Involved in Food Allergy Research

um Ahmad ·
So glad to be joining this group!! my 6 and 2 year old boys have allergies for dairy, eggs and tree nuts ����
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Re: Four Moms Show Power of Getting Involved in Food Allergy Research

Will Way ·
Welcome! My 6-year-old is allergic to eggs and tree nut too. I have found a lot of great tips and recipes on this website.
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Re: Join Us for the Release of a Monumental Food Allergy Report

Allison ·
If you missed the webinar, or want to listen again, you can find the recording here: http://nationalacademies.org/h...ies/2016-NOV-30.aspx
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

franandpaul ·
Thanks for this great overview!
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

sageone ·
This gives me hope that my child will eventually be allergy free and his life will not be in danger from a simple item of food! Thank you so much for this great article in layman terms so that we parents can understand it!
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

EAH123 ·
What a great overview! Thank you!
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

Jessica Dabler Martin ·
Fantastic overview of what is on the horizon. Thank you!
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

Sandra Sebastian ·
Hi Michael, Very interesting for us to read as I have more than one grandchild with food allergies! Congratulations on all your accomplishments and studies. Love from us all, your old Oxford neighbour!
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

cheymom ·
Welcome Jessica & Sandra! We are glad you found KFA. We hope you will join us on our Support Forums. We have several forums that may be of interest. Main Forum Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers We even have a new forum for saving money! http://community.kidswithfooda...s-for-food-allergies We have a fantastic Food & Cooking forum Don't forget to check out our recipe section! Come join us! .
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

Pearl ·
We are already doing Chinese Herbal medicine and seeing progress.
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

K8sMom2002 ·
@Chaunta How are you adding shellfish to your family's diet now that your little one passed the shellfish challenge?
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

LinzStein ·
Great overview! KFA- is there any additional info about the use of Allergen non-specific therapies for EoE? What about accupressure or homeopathics? Thank you!
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Re: The Future of Food Allergy: Developing New Treatments

Kathy P ·
I haven't seen anything specific regarding those. You could check in the News & Research forum.
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Re: Webinar: Anaphylaxis in America: A Look at the Landmark Study

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Video and Resources from the webinar: http://community.kidswithfooda...-video-and-resources
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Re: Free Webinar: A Look at the Landmark Study Anaphylaxis in America with Dr. Robert Wood

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Video and Resources from the webinar: http://community.kidswithfooda...-video-and-resources
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Re: The LEAP Trial 12 Months Later: Are We Ready to LEAP-On Peanut Allergy?

NKS ·
Ok, I'm probably going crazy but these seem wrong too! LEAP-On enrolled 88.5% of children from the original trial (556 children). Adherence to peanut avoidance in both groups was high during the 12 months families were told to stay away from peanuts: - 4% in the original peanut avoidance group, and - 3% in the peanut-eating group On Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Kids With Food Allergies < support@aafa.org > wrote:
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Re: The LEAP Trial 12 Months Later: Are We Ready to LEAP-On Peanut Allergy?

KFA News Team ·
EDIT: We fixed a coding error above to correct this section: Adherence to peanut avoidance in both groups was high during the 12 months families were told to stay away from peanuts: 90.4% in the original peanut avoidance group, and 69.3% in the peanut-eating group
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

RW ·
Is this a published study and do you have a citation? All I can find are new clips like this (that will probably get kids sent to the hospital.)I can't tell from any of the articles I've read say if the study was controlled for peanut component since kids are allergic to different proteins. I also wonder what the side effects were to ingesting that much bacteria. Gut flora is an ecosystem of it's own, and disrupting it may have consequences.
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

Allison ·
Hi, thank you for noticing! This is the citation; I read the study and I don't recall if they looked at different components, I would have to check again. We tried to make it clear that this is really just a first step and that parents should never, ever attempt to replicate medical studies at home! The citation is: Administration of a probiotic with peanut oral immunotherapy: A randomized trial Tang, Mimi L.K. et al. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology A press release to the research...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

RW ·
Thank you for sharing the citation. I read the abstract as the full text wasn't available. They did not control for peanut component, just skin test wheal size. I wonder why since such a difference has been shown with the components... I'd like to open up a question too as I noticed the study included very young children. I'm a mom with a peanut allergic kid and I want there to be research done, but I'm in an ethical conundrum when it comes to putting my kid in a study. I'm just not sure it...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

Allison ·
Hmmm. Good question! I'm not a doctor, but I can throw out some theories based on conversations I have had with doctors, plus my family's own experience with medical studies. I'm thinking that there may be a difference in how food allergy works or presents in children vs. adults, so the results would not be the same. Logistically, depending on the study, visits may require you to see a doctor somewhat often - it varies on the study. One I just looked at was every two weeks. If you work FT...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

RW ·
Thanks for your thoughtful response! We parents are faced with some difficult choices aren't we? How did you discover you child was allergic to things like mustard and chickpeas? My kid is swearing a Twizzler made her throat hurt, but she's not real trustworthy right now, she eats another flavor of them all the time and the ingredients are identical. I thin she didn't like this flavor and wanted the "yummy medicine" like her brother had moments before when dinner made his mouth itch. We are...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

Allison ·
Mustard - he had a hot dog, which included it as a hidden spice. He threw it up within the hour and had profuse rhinitis as well (sneezing/discharge from nose). We added that to the testing list at his next appointment. Chick peas, I honestly don't remember, it was so long ago. It may have been a rash around his mouth and itchiness. Shellfish is new. He was eating shrimp ok. He didn't really like it but I chopped it up small and gave it to him about once a month. Then I sort of fell off that...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

RW ·
Wow! What a tough journey. I love shrimp but am kind of afraid to try it with my kid. We had a bad experience with trying TN at home. I would advise your friend with the PN daughter to take it in careful steps. I thought my DD was PN only and gave her almonds, it went fine. Then I gave her cashews and we called 911.... First step is peanut component blood test. Apparently there are several different proteins in the peanut one can be allergic to. Some proteins track towards "outgrowing" it,...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

Kathy P ·
Yes, there is what is called "component testing" which can help predict the chances of outgrowing and/or passing an oral challenge based on which proteins you react to. All tree nuts are lumped together, but botanically/allergenically, there are different categories. The big problems is that they are all often processed together making everything cross contaminated. That's why a lot will recommend avoiding all tree nuts and peanuts if you are allergic even to just one. The chances of cross...
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

RW ·
She is 6 and loves cooking with me. She's also a great reader and we practice with labels. One thing I've wondered.... Do you know of a book that teaches kids the different names of nuts in a fun way? I learned by eating them, but when you avoid nuts it is hard to teach a kid all the names and shapes to be alert for. Thanks for all the feedback. I can't tell you how much I appreciate this website.
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

Kathy P ·
I don't know of any, but maybe others have some ideas. You will get more input if you ask that question on the Main forum .
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Re: Study of Australian Children Points to Possible Clue in Curing Peanut Allergy

Allison ·
I recently conducted a fake food tour via the Internet of various cheeses and nuts my son had to look out for. You could use Google Images.... We used to have a book but it was aimed at toddlers - I can't remember the name of the top of my head.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Well said! I've seen a lot of guilt responses to the study.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Eliezrah ·
I haven't heard anything about this study, but food allergies aren't anyone's fault!!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Leab ·
Great article :-) Thanks for taking the time to post it KFA!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Eliezrah - this is in reference to the LEAP study that was announced at AAAAI last weekend. You can read more about it here (link is also in the above article) Landmark Study May Change How We Feed Peanut Butter To Infants
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Eliezrah ·
Thanks Kathy. I can see why some people can read it as blaming the parents.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Jessica Dabler Martin ·
A very big thank you! This is fabulous information that needs to be heard more. I'm editing my blog post to include a link to KFA's post. Thank you again!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Thank you Jessica for including a link! And for helping us get the info out!
 
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