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peanut-residue-found-in-peanut-free-homes-study

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Peanut protein can show up, even in homes with no peanuts


People allergic to peanuts make every effort to avoid anything peanut-related, including having no peanut products in their house. According to a study being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting in San Antonio, avoiding peanuts and peanut products doesn’t reduce the level of peanut proteins found in dust in the home. Peanut proteins are the part of a peanut responsible for causing allergic reactions. Researchers examined dust from 24 houses where someone with a peanut allergy lived. Of those, 50 percent reported complete peanut avoidance in the home. They compared those results to a control group of 38 houses where no one lived who had a peanut allergy, and peanuts weren’t restricted. They found the dust collected from peanut allergic homes was not significantly lower in peanut residue than from the control homes. The good news appears to be that for the majority of people with peanut allergy to have a serious allergic reaction, the peanut protein would need to be ingested, either in the form of peanut-containing food or food contaminated with peanut. 

 

Abstract Title: Comparison of Ara h2 in Household Dust of Peanut Allergic vs. Nonallergic Individuals


Author: Jodi Shroba, MSN, APRN, CPNP, ACAAI member

 

Additional information: There are several misconceptions about peanut allergies. A peanut is a legume (belonging to the same family as soybeans, peas and lentils), not a tree nut. And while it was previously believed that an allergy to peanuts was lifelong, research by the National Institutes of Health shows that about 20 percent of individuals with a peanut allergy eventually outgrow it.

 

About ACAAI
The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 6,000 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

 

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Kandi, I think people are more worried about the initial dust burst when peanut products are opened, or smears of peanut butter on surfaces etc. not necessarily common house dust. I don't worry about house dust when entering a house or place that has it. I have encountered peanut butter smudges, ground peanut powder on the counter, and whole peanuts found in corners in some of these homes or establishments.  Does anyone in your family have a peanut allergy?

 

Tracy Roberts
Originally Posted by Tracy Roberts:

Another question is why this study is relevant in any way. What purpose could results of a study like this have?  Likely the amount of peanut in the dust in homes that avoid them is extremely minute.  If it is not causing any difficulty why even draw attention to it?

 

You ask very valid questions. Their sampling size is small. However, it looks promising that for many with peanut allergies, simply being in a home where peanut products are consumed is potentially not more "dangerous" than being in their own homes. 

 

Results of a "study" like this will serve to minimize the risks of peanuts, nuts and peanut butter in schools, airplanes etc. thus sabotaging efforts to ban these (for the allergic) deadly items. 

 

It makes the conclusion that if the peanut levels are essentially the same, the risk is as well. I am very aware that there are some individuals who are extremely sensitive and would react to such small amounts. I believe this is something to work out on a case by case basis, based on the individuals' medical history with the guidance of the allergist.

 

Who funded this study?  If only grants for studying food allergies would work on figuring out what is causing this epidemic, instead wasting money.

 

kandicejo

Another question is why this study is relevant in any way. What purpose could results of a study like this have?  Likely the amount of peanut in the dust in homes that avoid them is extremely minute.  If it is not causing any difficulty why even draw attention to it?

Results of a "study" like this will serve to minimize the risks of peanuts, nuts and peanut butter in schools, airplanes etc. thus sabotaging efforts to ban these (for the allergic) deadly items. 

Who funded this study?  If only grants for studying food allergies would work on figuring out what is causing this epidemic, instead wasting money.

Tracy Roberts
Kids With Food Allergies
A Division of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America
1235 South Clark Street Suite 305, Arlington, VA 22202
Phone: 1-800-7-ASTHMA (1.800.727.8462)
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