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Tagged With "LEAP-On"

Blog Post

AAFA and KFA Talk About Preventing Food Allergies With Pediatricians

KFA News Team ·
The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) recently exhibited at the 2019 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) conference. We learned the latest news in pediatrics and food allergies. We also spoke with doctors about the food allergy and asthma programs and services we offer. Kids With Food Allergies (KFA) is a division of AAFA.
Blog Post

The LEAP Trial 12 Months Later: Are We Ready to LEAP-On Peanut Allergy?

KFA News Team ·
Researchers announced results from the second phase of a landmark food allergy study, with the data showing that feeding peanuts to babies at high risk for developing the allergy sharply cuts their chance of becoming allergic by age 5.
Blog Post

Many Pediatricians Are Not Sharing New Peanut Introduction Guidelines With Parents

KFA News Team ·
Guidelines to help parents introduce peanut-containing products to infants to prevent peanut allergies aren’t being discussed. New research presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting shows pediatricians are not only not having the discussion, they’re not referring high-risk babies for testing prior to peanut introduction.
Blog Post Featured

Peanut Allergy Prevention: New Guidelines for Early Introduction

KFA Medical Advisors ·
For years, guidelines told us that parents and pediatricians should delay giving peanut-containing foods to children until after age three. However, all of our best evidence now shows that early introduction of peanut-containing foods is associated with less peanut allergy.
Blog Post

New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Why It’s Important to Read Past the Headlines -  Doctors Explain New Peanut Allergy Study   Editor's note:  The KFA/AAFA leadership recognize that interpreting the findings of the Learning Early About Peanut (LEAP) study is...
Blog Post

NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Early-Life Peanut Consumption Does Not Affect Duration of Breastfeeding or Children’s Growth and Nutrition
Blog Post

New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

KFA Medical Advisors ·
Since February, the food allergy community has been waiting to see how – or if -  a study hailed as a “landmark”  would change recommendations about feeding young infants at risk for developing a peanut allergy. This week,...
Comment

Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Well said! I've seen a lot of guilt responses to the study.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Eliezrah ·
I haven't heard anything about this study, but food allergies aren't anyone's fault!!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Leab ·
Great article :-) Thanks for taking the time to post it KFA!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Eliezrah - this is in reference to the LEAP study that was announced at AAAAI last weekend. You can read more about it here (link is also in the above article) Landmark Study May Change How We Feed Peanut Butter To Infants
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Eliezrah ·
Thanks Kathy. I can see why some people can read it as blaming the parents.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Jessica Dabler Martin ·
A very big thank you! This is fabulous information that needs to be heard more. I'm editing my blog post to include a link to KFA's post. Thank you again!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Thank you Jessica for including a link! And for helping us get the info out!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Juneau ·
Thank you doctors for posting this. I have wondered what I could've, should've, or would've done better, different, or something. Beating myself up over it doesn't change anything. I know all those parents out there with severely peanut allergic children did not do everything the same. I actually think it would've been a lot more difficult to watch my infant have an anaphylactic reaction than my 2 year old. At least she could talk to me.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

RW ·
A free press is not free to lie, mislead, and over-hype and it is high time to hold them accountable for all the damage they are doing to kids with allergies and society in general. The press is hugely irresponsible in how they report scientific findings. Science is slow, particular, and often very inconclusive. How many kids are going to DIE because of irresponsible reporting?! We have ongoing battle with family members and school administrators who deep in their hearts believe this is our...
Comment

Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

GreenMomma ·
Most pages I read say that the gut closes somewhere between 4 and 6 months old... Shouldn't their guidelines start from 6 months instead of 4?
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

goodsammy ·
Is there a difference between roasted and boiled peanuts? which version is less risky to begin with?
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

Jen ·
Hi greenmomma (welcome to posting) and good Sammy. I am going to check with some of our other volunteers and staff to see if someone knows those answers.
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

Lynda ·
Hi Goodsammy, The issue of introducing peanuts to babies is not whole peanuts or even peanut butter; it's peanut protein that would be in something like bamba , a baby biscuit that has peanut protein in it. But to answer your question, studies have been done that show that dry roasted peanuts appear to be more allergenic than boiled peanuts. Lynda
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

Kathy P ·
There was a study that showed dry roasted peanuts were more allergenic http://www.washingtonpost.com/...-a-new-oxford-study/
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Krissandra ·
I wish this could have applied to my children. My 4yo boy tested highly positive to peanuts at 6 months of age, so he would have been deemed too high risk to participate, anyway. And then there's my daughter, who has FPIES and still hasn't gotten around to trying peanuts. Now I'm terrified that the extremely slow process of introducing food into her diet means I've already missed my window of early prevention. She's definitely high risk for developing a peanut allergy since she has a sibling...
Comment

Re: The LEAP Trial 12 Months Later: Are We Ready to LEAP-On Peanut Allergy?

NKS ·
Ok, I'm probably going crazy but these seem wrong too! LEAP-On enrolled 88.5% of children from the original trial (556 children). Adherence to peanut avoidance in both groups was high during the 12 months families were told to stay away from peanuts: - 4% in the original peanut avoidance group, and - 3% in the peanut-eating group On Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Kids With Food Allergies < support@aafa.org > wrote:
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Re: The LEAP Trial 12 Months Later: Are We Ready to LEAP-On Peanut Allergy?

KFA News Team ·
EDIT: We fixed a coding error above to correct this section: Adherence to peanut avoidance in both groups was high during the 12 months families were told to stay away from peanuts: 90.4% in the original peanut avoidance group, and 69.3% in the peanut-eating group
Comment

Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Will Way ·
The peanut thing confuses me really. I wonder what about peanuts is so allergenic that if it is not introduced early that many children have reactions to it. That seems to be the million dollar question, right?
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Chaunta ·
@Will Way children as young as the newborn age have shown to have a deadly reaction to peanuts/treenuts from the mother's milk or have a skin reaction after being touched by someone with residue on their hands. The peanut protein is different from other nuts. It is actually a legume. Not a nut!
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Will Way ·
Hi Chaunta! Welcome to KFA! Do you have a child with peanut allergies?
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Chaunta ·
@WILL WAY yes he has a peanut/tree/nut. He passed the shellfish challenge a few weeks ago.
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Chaunta ·
I meant peanut/ treenut allergy.
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Will Way ·
Congratulations on passing the shellfish challenge! You can go to the main support forum and introduce yourself when you have time. That is a great place to ask any questions that you may have and just to tell us about your family.
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Chaunta ·
Thanks! Very excited yet still sheepish and paranoid about serving it up. LOL.
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

Jen ·
Hi Chaunta, Welcome to KFA. I hear you about serving something that was once an allergen. My dd passed a tn challenge a year and a half ago. It took a while to get used to having them in the house. btw, our forums are an awesome place for support, advice and btdt experience.
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Re: NIH-Funded Study Shows Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy Is Nutritionally Safe

K8sMom2002 ·
@Chaunta How are you adding shellfish to your family's diet now that your little one passed the shellfish challenge?
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Re: Data Shows Early Introduction Has Led to a Decrease in Peanut Allergy

JenniferW. ·
I have three children. The third has peanut allergy. I never gave the first two peanut until they were three and four years old. Not sure how I feel about this study.
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Re: Data Shows Early Introduction Has Led to a Decrease in Peanut Allergy

Kathy P ·
Hi Jennifer - not introducing early doesn't mean that your child will develop a peanut allergy. Early introduction may prevent the development of a peanut allergy in those children who have other risk factors. There is definitely more research that needs to be done.
Blog Post

Data Shows Early Introduction Has Led to a Decrease in Peanut Allergy

KFA News Team ·
According to new research scheduled for presentation during the 2021 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Virtual Annual Meeting, despite finding that peanut allergy prevalence is still high among those with early introduction to peanut, the study authors did discover that early introduction led to a 16% decrease in peanut allergy.
Blog Post

Products Aimed at Preventing Food Allergy Contain Varying Levels of Allergens

KFA News Team ·
There are significant variances in the allergen composition, concentration, and dose per serving in commercial early allergen introduction foods (EIF), according to research being presented at the 2021 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) Virtual Annual Meeting.
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