Tagged With "infant"

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Research Links Infants’ Microbiome to Development of Immune System, Allergic Diseases and Asthma

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Results from Detroit Birth Cohort First Revealed at AAAAI Annual Meeting   (Press Release)   Houston, TX – A number of studies related to the Wayne County Health Environment Allergy and Asthma Longitudinal Study in Detroit (WHEALS)...
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New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Why It’s Important to Read Past the Headlines -  Doctors Explain New Peanut Allergy Study   Editor's note:  The KFA/AAFA leadership recognize that interpreting the findings of the Learning Early About Peanut (LEAP) study is...
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Nutrition and the Child With Food Allergies: A Family Affair (Video and Resources)

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Kids With Food Allergies (KFA), a division of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, hosted a free educational webinar on March 31, 2015, featuring Debra Indorato, RDN, from our Medical Advisory Team.   Deb discussed “Nutrition and...
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Study Supports AAP Allergy Prevention Recommendations

Kids With Food Allergies ·
A study published in Pediatrics on November 18, 2013, supports the current American Academy of Pediatrics' allergy prevention recommendations to not introduce solids before 4 to 6 months of age. The study found the delay of the...
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Mold, Moisture Damage Leads to Long-Lasting Respiratory Effects, Study Finds

Kids With Food Allergies ·
A Finnish study found that moisture damage in the rooms where children spend most of their time led to an increased asthma risk, according to a February 16 story published in the journal Pediatrics.   A civil engineer studied the homes of nearly...
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Infant Fed Only Almond Milk Develops Scurvy from Lack of Nutrients

Kids With Food Allergies ·
A recent report shows the dangers of feeding infants alternative milks instead of breast milk or formula. Doctors diagnosed an 11-month-old infant with scurvy, according to a report in Medical Daily . The baby boy was breastfed for two months. He developed a skin condition due to suspected milk allergy and his diet was changed to just almond milk. The almond milk caused a lack of nutrition, including vitamin C. The baby had bone fractures and was immobile. Doctors diagnosed him with scurvy.
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Infants and Toddlers Require Special Attention with Epinephrine Autoinjectors

KFA News Team ·
Press Release: Contact: Melissa Graham mgraham@aaaai.org (414) 272-6071 Onsite Press Room (March 4-7): (213) 743-6242 INFANTS AND TODDLERS REQUIRE SPECIAL ATTENTION WITH EPINEPHRINE AUTOINJECTORS Researchers at AAAAI Annual Meeting Believe Needles May Be Too Long for Standard Care Los Angeles, CA – What is the optimal needle length for infants and toddlers who need epinephrine? Researchers from Western University Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry in London, Ontario, asked this...
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Landmark Study May Change How We Feed Peanut Butter To Infants

Kids With Food Allergies ·
High-Risk Infants Fed Peanuts Developed Allergy At Lower Rate Than Other Babies - Study May Pave Way for New Prevention Strategies   Feeding peanut butter to infants at risk for developing peanut allergies prevented those same babies from...
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AAAAI: Introducing Egg to Infants with Eczema

Kids With Food Allergies ·
http://www.aaaai.org/global/la...-infants-eczema.aspx Infants with eczema are much more likely to develop a food allergy than infants who do not have the condition.  Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies in...
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Experts Consider Changes to Infant Feeding Guidelines to Prevent Food Allergies

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Have your say in the future of food allergy recommendations! The National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is seeking public comment on changes to guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy. Federal health officials want to know what you think about three recommendations regarding the early introduction of peanuts to babies: High-risk infants begin eating peanut-containing food as early as 4-6 months. Infants are considered at risk if they have severe...
Blog Post Featured

Feeding Allergenic Foods to Babies and Pregnant or Nursing Moms

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Eat It or Avoid It? by Todd D. Green, MD, FAAAAI   Once you have a child who has severe food allergies and have experienced how hard it can be to keep that child safe, you naturally want to do anything you can to keep your next child (or...
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Can We EAT Our Way to Prevention of Food Allergies?

KFA News Team ·
We now have very strong evidence that early introduction of peanut can prevent the development of peanut allergy. Does this apply to other allergenic foods? The authors of the newest research study, Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) sought to answer this question.
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New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

KFA Medical Advisors ·
Since February, the food allergy community has been waiting to see how – or if -  a study hailed as a “landmark”  would change recommendations about feeding young infants at risk for developing a peanut allergy. This week,...
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Re: Can We EAT Our Way to Prevention of Food Allergies?

NKS ·
Hi, is there a typo in this summary? I may just be tired, but I don't see how this reflects a risk reduction (at all, let alone 67%): Thanks, Naomi However, when the authors evaluated the infants that were able to maintain the study protocol by eating these foods consistently each week, they did find a significant difference in rates of food allergy: - 4% in the early introduction group versus - 3% in the standard group On Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 3:39 PM, Kids With Food Allergies <...
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Re: Can We EAT Our Way to Prevention of Food Allergies?

KFA News Team ·
Update: We fixed a coding error to correct this section above: However, when the authors evaluated the infants that were able to maintain the study protocol by eating these foods consistently each week, they did find a significant difference in rates of food allergy: 2.4% in the early introduction group versus 7.3% in the standard group
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Well said! I've seen a lot of guilt responses to the study.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Eliezrah ·
I haven't heard anything about this study, but food allergies aren't anyone's fault!!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Leab ·
Great article :-) Thanks for taking the time to post it KFA!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Eliezrah - this is in reference to the LEAP study that was announced at AAAAI last weekend. You can read more about it here (link is also in the above article) Landmark Study May Change How We Feed Peanut Butter To Infants High-Risk Infants Fed Peanuts Developed Allergy At Lower Rate Than Other Babies - Study May Pave Way for New Prevention Strategies Feeding peanut butter to infants at risk for developing peanut allergies prevented those same babies from developing the allergies by the age...
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Eliezrah ·
Thanks Kathy. I can see why some people can read it as blaming the parents.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Jessica Dabler Martin ·
A very big thank you! This is fabulous information that needs to be heard more. I'm editing my blog post to include a link to KFA's post. Thank you again!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Kathy P ·
Thank you Jessica for including a link! And for helping us get the info out!
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Juneau ·
Thank you doctors for posting this. I have wondered what I could've, should've, or would've done better, different, or something. Beating myself up over it doesn't change anything. I know all those parents out there with severely peanut allergic children did not do everything the same. I actually think it would've been a lot more difficult to watch my infant have an anaphylactic reaction than my 2 year old. At least she could talk to me.
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

RW ·
A free press is not free to lie, mislead, and over-hype and it is high time to hold them accountable for all the damage they are doing to kids with allergies and society in general. The press is hugely irresponsible in how they report scientific findings. Science is slow, particular, and often very inconclusive. How many kids are going to DIE because of irresponsible reporting?! We have ongoing battle with family members and school administrators who deep in their hearts believe this is our...
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

GreenMomma ·
Most pages I read say that the gut closes somewhere between 4 and 6 months old... Shouldn't their guidelines start from 6 months instead of 4?
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

goodsammy ·
Is there a difference between roasted and boiled peanuts? which version is less risky to begin with?
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

Jen ·
Hi greenmomma (welcome to posting) and good Sammy. I am going to check with some of our other volunteers and staff to see if someone knows those answers.
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

Lynda ·
Hi Goodsammy, The issue of introducing peanuts to babies is not whole peanuts or even peanut butter; it's peanut protein that would be in something like bamba , a baby biscuit that has peanut protein in it. But to answer your question, studies have been done that show that dry roasted peanuts appear to be more allergenic than boiled peanuts. Lynda
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Re: New Guidelines: When to Feed Peanuts to Infants

Kathy P ·
There was a study that showed dry roasted peanuts were more allergenic http://www.washingtonpost.com/...-a-new-oxford-study/
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Re: New Peanut Allergy Study Does Not Say Parents Are to Blame

Krissandra ·
I wish this could have applied to my children. My 4yo boy tested highly positive to peanuts at 6 months of age, so he would have been deemed too high risk to participate, anyway. And then there's my daughter, who has FPIES and still hasn't gotten around to trying peanuts. Now I'm terrified that the extremely slow process of introducing food into her diet means I've already missed my window of early prevention. She's definitely high risk for developing a peanut allergy since she has a sibling...
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Re: Experts Consider Changes to Infant Feeding Guidelines to Prevent Food Allergies

T Meach ·
High-risk infants begin eating peanut-containing food as early as 4-6 months. Infants are considered at risk if they have severe eczema, egg allergy or both. A qualified healthcare provider should perform testing first to see if an allergy already exists. I agree wholeheartedly re: the allergy testing. We had to wait until our child was 1 years old and found out through reactions when we tried our child on new foods. As a new parent, it was a terrifying experience to go through without the...
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Re: Infant Fed Only Almond Milk Develops Scurvy from Lack of Nutrients

prometheamoth ·
Milk substitutes clearly state on the packaging that it is not a substitute for formula.
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Re: Infant Fed Only Almond Milk Develops Scurvy from Lack of Nutrients

Carolyn Ann ·
The title is misleading. It's not just almond milk. Any milk would do the same thing. Cow's milk contains 4 - 6% of an adults Vitamin C needs (some labels even say 0%). That means an 8 oz glass only has 5.4 mg. For a baby under 6 months they would need to drink 7.5 bottles of milk to get the Vit C needed. For a baby over 6 months it would be 9.3 bottles a day. Of course, they would be getting food as well. Point being made is that formula has the vitamins supplemented. If not using breast...
Blog Post

When and How to Introduce Babies to Peanuts to Reduce Peanut Allergy

KFA News Team ·
Parents may be confused with how and when to introduce peanut-containing foods to their infants. Presentations at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting will offer guidance, based on soon to be released guidelines, on how to approach this topic without going “nuts.”
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Reducing Risk of Peanut Allergy – A Review of New Guidelines (Video and Resources)

Kids With Food Allergies ·
The new guidelines recommend introduction of peanut-containing foods to infants as early as 4 and 6 months of age. How peanut-containing foods should be introduced to infants depends on the infant’s risk level.
Blog Post Featured

New Guidelines for Early Introduction of Peanut

KFA Medical Advisors ·
For years, guidelines told us that parents and pediatricians should delay giving peanut-containing foods to children until after age three. However, all of our best evidence now shows that early introduction of peanut-containing foods is associated with less peanut allergy.
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WEBINAR: Reducing Risk of Peanut Allergy – A Review of New Guidelines

Kids With Food Allergies ·
New guidelines released in 2017 may help prevent the development of peanut allergy. The guidelines recommend early introduction of peanut-containing foods to infants as early as 4 and 6 months of age. How peanut-containing foods should be introduced to infants depends on the infant’s risk level. Join us for a free webinar on January 26, 2017 at 3 pm EST.
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FDA Will Review New AUVI-Q Epinephrine Auto-Injector for Infants and Small Children

Kids With Food Allergies ·
Kaléo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Priority Review of its supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for AUVI-Q 0.1 mg, the first known epinephrine auto-injector specifically designed for the treatment of life-threatening allergic reactions in infants and small children weighing 16.5 to 33 pounds.
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