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Food Allergy Updates from Medical Advisory Team

AAFA’s Ask the Allergist: Do High IgE Levels Mean My Child Has an Allergy?

Information from AAFA’s Ask the Allergist is not a substitute for a consultation with a health care professional. Always talk with your own doctor before making changes to your or your child's asthma or allergy management plan. Q: My son has elevated IgE levels. Does that mean he has allergies? A: IgE (Immunoglobin E) are antibodies produced by the immune system. They can be high for many reasons. A common reason may include the presence of an allergic condition. Allergic conditions include...

What to Do If You Can’t Afford Epinephrine Auto-Injectors

The manufacturers of epinephrine auto-injectors have extended their U.S. savings card programs through 2018. Epinephrine is the only treatment for a severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis). It is only available through a prescription by your doctor. Each prescription comes with two auto-injectors in a set. People with food allergies need two of these auto-injectors with them at all times.

Q&A: What Does Omalizumab Mean for Oral Immunotherapy Treatment for Multiple Food Allergies?

Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a proposed method to treat food allergy. It is currently in late-stage clinical trials (peanut specifically). It is expected to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) soon. There have been many clinical trials for specific food OIT alone and with medicines, such as omalizumab, as reported in this study.

Peanut Allergy Prevention: New Guidelines for Early Introduction

For years, guidelines told us that parents and pediatricians should delay giving peanut-containing foods to children until after age three. However, all of our best evidence now shows that early introduction of peanut-containing foods is associated with less peanut allergy.

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Kids With Food Allergies
A Division of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America
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